Select mutual funds, ETFs, or both to populate your starting universe.

Filter your starting universe by selecting from the four major Lipper fund categories.

Browse/filter funds using Lippers classification system. If you wish to search across all classifications, click Select All.

Browse/filter funds using fund family name under which funds are grouped.

A load is a sales charge paid by an investor when purchasing shares in a mutual fund.

The minimum dollar amount required for an initial investment in a fund.

The total fees and expenses charged by a fund for all the various services needed to run the fund.

Returns the dividend yield for the period and date(s) requested in local currency by default. This is calculated as Dividends Per Share divided by Price Close, multiplied by 100.

The year in which a particular fund manager began managing a funds portfolio.

This field filters all mutual funds that are open to new investors.

This field filters all mutual funds to only return those that are index funds and not actively managed funds.

A performance calculation that includes the reinvestment of all income and capital gains distributions.

A performance calculation that includes the reinvestment of all income and capital gains distributions.

A performance calculation that includes the reinvestment of all income and capital gains distributions using an exponential formula.

A performance calculation that includes the reinvestment of all income and capital gains distributions using an exponential formula.

A performance calculation that includes the reinvestment of all income and capital gains distributions using an exponential formula.

A funds volatility relative to the S&P 500 over 3 years.

The degree to which an assets correlation with the market has explained its fluctuations over 3 years.

A measure of how a funds percent changes over 3 years have varied from the mean.

Sharpe ratio is a measure of reward-to-volatility trade off developed by William F. Sharpe, also known as reward-to-volatility ratio. Sharpe ratio is calculated as the average of excess returns over the standard deviation of excess returns. Excess return is the difference between the fund return and the risk-free return. Sharpe ratio can be presented on annualized basis. A higher Sharpe ratio indicates better performance on risk-adjusted basis.

Percentage of a portfolios total net assets invested in a particular sector.

The percentage of a mutual funds portfolio that is bought and sold to exchange for other securities.

The Lipper Rating for Total Return denotes a fund that has provided superior total returns (income from dividends and interest as well as capital appreciation) when compared to a group of similar funds. The Lipper Rating for Total Return may be the best fit for investors who want the best historical return, without looking at risk. This measure alone may not be suitable for investors who want to avoid downside risk. For more risk-averse investors, the Total Return ratings can be used with Preservation and/or Consistent Return ratings to make an appropriate selection that balances the risk and return.

The Lipper Rating for Consistent Return identifies a fund that has provided relatively superior consistency and risk-adjusted returns when compared to a group of similar funds. Funds which achieve high ratings for Consistent Return may be the best fit for investors who value a funds year-to-year consistency relative to other funds in a particular peer group. Investors are cautioned that some peer groups are inherently more volatile than others, and even Lipper Leaders for Consistent Return in the most volatile groups may not be well suited to shorter-term goals or less risk-tolerant investors.

The Lipper Rating for Preservation is a fund that has demonstrates a superior ability to preserve capital in a variety of markets when compared with other funds in its asset class. Choosing a Lipper Rating for Preservation may help to minimize downside risk relative to other fund choices in the same asset class. Investors are cautioned that equity funds have historically been more volatile than mixed-equity or fixed-income funds, and that even the Lipper Rating for Preservation in more volatile asset classes may not be well suited to shorter-term goals or less risk-tolerant investors.

The Lipper Ratings for Tax Efficiency identifies a fund that has been successful at deferring taxes over the measurement period relative to similar funds. The Lipper Ratings for Tax Efficiency may be the best fit for tax-conscious investors who hold investments that are not in a defined-benefit or retirement plan account. Investors in high federal tax brackets are more likely than those in lower tax brackets to see more benefit from tax-efficient funds.

The Lipper Rating for Expense identifies a fund that has successfully managed to keep its expenses low relative to its peers and within its load structure. The Lipper Rating for Expense may be the best fit for investors who want to minimize their total costs. It can be used in conjunction with Total Return or Consistent Return to identify funds with above-average performance and lower-than-average cost.

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Select mutual funds, ETFs, or both to populate your starting universe.

Select mutual funds, ETFs, or both to populate your starting universe.